Deuce Cities Henhouse

Macrame Beaded Hanging Planter & Giveaway

Make a Modern Beaded Macrame Planter
Hello Peoples! How are you guys doing? It’s Monday, and I have a really cool project to share with you plus another awesome giveaway – you can thank my pals at Ace for that! It’s finally starting to be porch season, the weather is coming around a bit, and things are starting to feel ah-very nice (ala Borat). We’ve been hanging in our porch whenever we’re not doing the million other things that we’re always doing.

I always get antsy for a project after getting back into porch life. I just can’t sit in there and relax, I look around the space trying to figure out ways to tweak it and make it better. This spring I’d been looking for a few ways to add another layer of awesomeness to it, and this months project from Ace was the perfect excuse to go for it. I got inspired by a new color palette which is a mash up of OPI nail colors in latex paint format. How did this happen you ask? Well, Clark+Kensington have been teaming up with OPI at the paint studio for the past few years bringing some of OPI‘s most iconic nail colors to DIY projects everywhere. I picked the Creative Genius palette for obvious reasons. Honestly though, I was smitten by how it was heavy on the green side. Although I love the blue, green is my fav color. Plus the color “Bubble Bath” might be my new favorite shade of pink. I was happy to focus a project around this perfectly porch-suited (and summery) color palette.

I knew that the porch was lacking in lushness and I figured what better way to get some green up in this light filled space then some modern beaded macrame-ish hanging planters. I did something very similar in my kitchen last year and I figured I could apply the same ideas, but with more color (and beads) for the porch. We don’t have tons of surface space for planters in our porch – utilizing vertical space with hanging planters is the way to go, plus it helps to create a bit of privacy from our neighbors porch.

So how does one make a planter you ask? Don’t worry budz, I will tell you so you will know the secrets too. I could sense that you were a little worried about that, so let me just put your mind at ease and let you know that I am including photos and words to help illustrate how to make these cool things right here, in this post, on this website!

Make a Modern Beaded Macrame Planter

Make a Modern Beaded Macrame Planter
I used a bit of that awesome pink (bubble bath) I mentioned above to do a quick DIY crux table runner with a bit of scrap fabric I had stashed away. I like it mucho.

Make a Modern Beaded Macrame Planter

Make a Modern Beaded Macrame Planter

Make a Modern Beaded Macrame Planter

Make a Modern Beaded Macrame Planter
Creative Genius, the truth and my color muse. OPI colors for Clark+Kensington from top to bottom: Barefoot in Barcelona, Bubble Bath, Jade is the New Black, Green-wich Village, Marry Me.

Make a Modern Beaded Macrame Planter
I wanted my standard-issue-craft-store wood beads to be colorful so I painted them, dur. How does one paint a tiny sphere though? I dunno, but I kinda figured out a way. I used a bit of pipe cleaner and strung the beads across a cardboard box to catch the drippings. I laid it on thick with the paint, and then just rotated the beads every 15 minutes to avoid drip marks – picture a tiny bead rotisserie if you will without all the deliciousness of one.

Make a Modern Beaded Macrame Planter
Hey – These instructions are for a six stringed planter – if you want the instructions for the other 8 stringed planter shown also in these pics, go check out this link, bros.

CLICK HERE FOR THE “HOW-TO” & GIVEAWAY DETAILS!

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in Around the House, Crafts, DIY, How-To, Sponsored

Planting a Tree

How to Plant a Tree | Deuce Cities HenHouse
Hey guys! We did some adding and subtracting in the yard over the weekend. We added a new tree and removed an old concrete column that was located at the base of our back stairs. I had the luxury of having a broken hand and wrist, so I couldn’t help out (it killed me). My kid, my neighbor and my husband jumped in to plant a new tree in our backyard – aren’t they some good dudes, er what?

Why do we need a new tree? Simple, to create more privacy. We have a rental on the side of our house and ever since my aging crust-punk-neighbor (renter) declared me his “enemy ’till death,” in front of my mom and my 5-year-old-kid one sunny afternoon, I’ve been determined to create as much distance between that house and mine as I can. This Dakota Pinnacle Birch will stand tall at 30′, is nice and dense with leaves, and spans the width of 8′. The tree is the perfect size to block out the perched view my neighbor has of our back yard from his second floor deck, while at the same time being architectural in shape as to limit our entire backyard from becoming too shaded. Most of you probably don’t have the luck of having a completely terrible neighbor so planting a tree for this specific reason probably isn’t an issue you for you. However, I have smartly written this post so even if you’re adding a shade tree to a sunny yard or an ornamental tree to a garden bed, the same rules apply.

How to Plant a Tree | Deuce Cities HenHouse

Choose a location, make sure it will not get in the way of foot traffic, isn’t too close to walkways or structures and isn’t planted under power lines. Call before you dig! Make sure you know where your utility lines run under your yard. Most cities have a number you can call, in Minneapolis it’s 811.

Remove loose soil from the top of root ball.
Often times trees from garden centers come packed with extra soil. It is important that the trees trunk is not covered and the soil only comes up far enough to cover the roots only.

 
How to Plant a Tree | Deuce Cities HenHouse

Measure
Measure the width of the root ball and make a hole 2-3 times as wide and equally as deep. It is important not to dig deeper than the depth of the rootball as you don’t want to backfill and have soil cover the trunk of the tree.

 
How to Plant a Tree | Deuce Cities HenHouse

Skim off the grass
With a garden spade or shovel remove the grass and roots from top of the tree bed. Use a tarp to protect the lawn and collect the grass. Use a wheelbarrow to collect the soil. If you have bare spots in your lawn re-use the sod to fill in sparse areas of lawn.

 
How to Plant a Tree | Deuce Cities HenHouse

Remove tree for pot or burlap.
Remove tree for pot or burlap, take care to pull it up directly from the pot making sure not to damage the branches. If the tree is rather large tip the tree on it’s side to slide the pot off or remove burlap. Pulling the tree near the base of the trunk usually works best.
Loosen the roots
Use a cultivator or gardening trowel to loosen the roots around the root ball. The tree roots have been compacted into their pot and need to be loosened up so they can spread out and take root in the new tree bed.

 
How to Plant a Tree | Deuce Cities HenHouse

Add compost or fertilizer
Add compost or fertilizer to the bottom of your hole. I always add a bag of compost but if you are considering amending the soil with fertilizer, make sure to ask a nursery professional what kind of fertilizer to use and how much.
Center the tree
Center the tree in the hole and and rotate it so you have it facing pretty side out (every tree has a good side). I pointed the less pretty side towards the jerky neighbors house.

 
How to Plant a Tree | Deuce Cities HenHouse

Water Deeply
Make dirt tree soup – that’s what Finn calls it. Water that hole deeply, plunge in the hose and fill it up to the top with water before backfilling with soil.
Mulch
Mulch the bed of the tree – be generous and cover in a good 3″ of mulch. Take care not to mulch near the base of the tree. Around the garden edge pile the mulch up so that it creates a bowl, this will help the bed retain water for the tree.

 
How to Plant a Tree | Deuce Cities HenHouse

Water, water, water.
Water, water, water. Rule of thumb. Water everyday the first week, twice a week the second, and at least once a week until the frost.

How to Plant a Tree | Deuce Cities HenHouse

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in gardening, How-To, Outdoor

Introducing the HenHouse App!


Bros! Check it out, you can now find Deuce Cities HenHouse in App form. Isn’t that the coolest? It’s packed with all the same info you can find on the blog, but is super well organized and slick to use on your phone.

The cool folks over at DWNLD helped me get this app and running. DWNLD is an app itself and it allows people of the world to customize their content and get it easily transformed into app form. I loved the experience of creating the app with DWNLD’s easy to use interface – literally what you see is what you get, just choose a theme and customize it with fonts and colors. As a design and coding nerd it was really exciting to see my blog take shape in app form.

Anyway, for you true HenHouse heads out there, I encourage you to download the app and give it a spin. I think you’ll like what you see :)

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in Awesomeness

Basement Update & Plans

Hey Guys! Hope you all had a sweet weekend. We chilled so hard, and it felt pretty great. Anyway – I thought I’d take a sec and fill you doodz in on whats been happening (or not happening) in our basement. To refresh your memory, this basement remodel was supposed to be a spring project complete in time for the summer. It is now almost the end of spring and the basement remodel is officially going to start in two weeks and hopefully be completed in time for the fall.

So what’s been going on this whole time? Interviewing contractors took us much longer than anticipated. Then there has been a whole lot of planning between us and our contractor. We needed to measure everything out and decide on all sorts of finishes like the doors, windows, flooring, lights, etc. Of course, all of these things effect the budget so we’ve had to do some trimming here and there. We’ve said “so long” to the fireplace – we knew it was going to be the first on the cutting block, but I was still sad to see it go. The bathroom remodel has been pushed back – because right now it doesn’t fit in the budgj. I will however be tackling most of the bathroom and spiffing up the shared laundry/workspace over the fall and winter. I’m VERY excited to have a winter project already lined up.

In two weeks the demo will start, then the gas meter will be moved, and plumbing and electrical will begin. The contractor will be responsible for installing the floor, drywall, electrical, plumbing, heating and completing the bathroom rough-in. From there I will takeover and finish with built in cabinets, paint, wallpaper ETC.

I’ve had to come up with a pretty realized vision for this project to ensure all the furniture, cabinets and appliances would fit into the space. Here’s a look at my plans – I’m getting excited about seeing the spaces come together when all said in done. We’re so excited!

+++ image source +++
stylizimo blog

+++ sources +++
1 karlstad sofa | 2karndean flooring | 3 – plants & modern planters | 4woods wallpaper | 5kasbah rug | 6reproduction hardware | 7white coffee table | 8 – two panel door | 9 – simple baseboard | 10 – navy upholstery for vintage chair

+++ image source +++
elements of style | house & home

+++ sources +++
1 sconce | 2 – brass drawer pull | 3dark blue penny tile | 4 – subway tile | 5 – white vanity | 6brass shower trim | 7lavatory faucet

+++ image source +++
remodolista

+++ sources +++
1 pegboard | 2cabinets | 3miter saw work bench | 4miter saw
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in Around the House, Inspiration

1 Year Later : Our Horizontal Fence

Horizontal Fence Stained Dark Brown
Hey doodz, remember last year when we got our new fence installed? (Part 1, Part 2) Well today I wanted to share with you how it be lookin’ one year later. I’ve stained it since the last time we talked about it. I decided to go for a dark brown stain (semi-transparent chocolate by behr), and I really like it although staining was a total bear of a job. It took me 5 gallons of stain, many, many, M A N Y hours, and tons of slivers. It was worth it, although if I ever had to do it again I would seriously consider hiring it out.

What can I tell you about staining; it’s a pain, it’s hard, and slats are dumb. I used a brush because I wanted the color to look variegated and dimensional, so some of the slats had 3 heavy coats of stain and others had 2 lighter coats – it all took a lot of time and effort but I’m really happy with how it all turned out. Just to give you some idea, I began this staining project last fall and finished it at the end of April. It was a big project and took an enormous amount of time – I better like it.

To refresh your memory, we previously had a dated chain link fence with green plastic slats – not a pretty backdrop for the garden vibes we were going after. Last spring we had installed a horizontal cedar slatted fence. We had added a 4′ fence on one side of our yard, and a 6′ privacy fence on the other (can you tell which neighbor I don’t like?). We added gates to both sides of the house, and a big gate in the back opening up to a concrete slab on the side of our garage.

Horizontal Fence Stained Dark Brown
Now that the fence is installed and stained we seriously love everything about the fence! I couldn’t be happier with the outcome.

Bros, I’m not gonna tip-toe around it, this is a sponsored post, and I’m proudly endorsing Fencein Deck, the company who built our fence. If you’re in the twin cities area and are looking to have a fence built, (custom or otherwise) please consider giving Dave a call (651-246-3176) or shoot him an e-mail, he is a good dude who has built a solid business (Fencein Deck) for himself here in Minnesota. He’s got years and years of experience, is friendly as hell, and will make sure you are getting exactly what you want. Look at me, I am crazy and came to him with very specific plans for my fence, he was happy to oblige and was easy to work with. When I proposed fencing in the back parking pad, adding a gate and drilling some holes through the concrete, he said “yeah, we can do that”! Not only was he easy to work with he took great care when it came to my yard and garden. Dave installed the Fence in the early spring, many of my perennials were barely showing and Dave made sure not to trample them, which I appreciated to no end.

Please feel free to shoot me any fence questions you may have – I’m happy to answer any of them :)

Horizontal Fence Stained Dark Brown

Horizontal Fence Stained Dark Brown

FenceIn Deck Fences!
A few examples of Fencein Deck’s handy work.
 

Horizontal Fence Stained Dark Brown

Horizontal Fence Stained Dark Brown

Horizontal Fence Stained Dark Brown

Horizontal Fence Stained Dark Brown

Horizontal Fence Stained Dark Brown

Horizontal Fence Stained Dark Brown

I’m so excited to be teaming up with a local company like Fencein Deck for this post. To the readers, you can’t get a nicer dude to build your fence than Dave and his team at Fencein Deck. Thanks Dave, for sponsoring the post!
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in Outdoor, Sponsored