Deuce Cities Henhouse

My March Garden

Sedum


I’m getting so excited that it’s almost garden time. Spring is my favorite time of year, and I am dying to get my hands dirty. I especially love that gardening is one of those things where there is always room for improvement. I couldn’t be happy if it was just done and there was nothing to do or improve upon.

I’ve just ordered some soaker hose for irrigation in my raised beds. It’s not a super pro set-up but it will be more sophisticated then what I have going on now. I’m excited to see if this new system will have big effects on this seasons veggie crop. I’m also going to be trying my hand at DIY landscape lighting. Now that the gardens are becoming more mature, I think it’s the perfect time to add lighting, like real-deal grown up lighting. Don’t worry, I’ll post about that too. Also, the front steps will be finally replaced this summer with new concrete steps, which in turn will effect the shape of the surrounding garden beds. Our front steps are a huge embarrassment and have been on our to-do list for years, so to get them taken care of will be a huge relief and a big improvement to the curb appeal of the house.

So, things are happening, and this March garden is just the start. I can’t wait to share lots more as the season progresses.

 

Bleeding Hearts

 

Lamium

 

Rose Buds

 

Hosta

 

Day Lilies

 

Heuchera

 

Allium


I planted two bulbs last fall and have only seen one so far – still have my fingers crossed.

 

Peony

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in gardening

House Plants : ZZ Plant

House Plants to Love : ZZ Plant
Hey Guys! I wasn’t expecting to take so much time in-between-posts, I had put this one all together and hoped to finish it during the course of a long train ride, but instead I just decided to not finish it. The fam and I went on a much needed vacation last week. The boys have finally reached an age where the make decent traveling companions. We headed out to the west coast to start our vacation journey in Portland, however we made the mistake and took the discount airline, Frontier. Due to a delayed flight we missed our connecting flight and the airline was unable to book us on another flight (so lame). So, we scrambled, emptied our wallets, and somehow made it to Seattle at 2AM, just in time to hop on a train. At least we got to see the entire west coast from top to bottom, which bt-dubs, was insanely beautiful. Did you guys know that spring exists in other places? We got to Seattle just as the tree buds began to open – so jealous. We ended up a few days later in Palm Springs where we rented a beautiful house. I don’t want to tell too much cause my plan was to do a whole trip recap sometime in the near future. For now I am in bed with a cold (cause that’s what happens after the best vacay) and struggling to finish up this post.

On to business, today I’m sharing a newer favorite house plant, the ZZ plant (aka Zanzibar Gem). Let me start by saying that I have four of these things, and have never had as much as a wilted stem no matter how much I neglect them. I purchased my first plant about two years ago, enough time to learn that these guys are slow growers. Here in the midwest, the ZZ Plant usually puts out a few new shoots around the new year which take about 2-3 months to be fully realized (warmer temperatures will typically result in more growth). The thing I love about them is their vibrant green, glossy, symmetrical leaf pattern. It’s so perfect it can often be mistaken for plastic, but don’t be fooled my friends. For all you brown thumbs out there, this plant can tolerate low-light and neglect, and still pull off babe plant status.

These should be easy for you to find, almost every big box hardware store, and blue and yellow swedish wonderland sells them. The ZZ Plant prefers moderate to low light preferring to be kept out of direct sunlight. Shoot for anything but a south face window and they should be okay. If you notice curling brown leaves your plant is getting too much light and should be placed in a shadier locaisch. They prefer to be watered lightly and appreciate drying out between drinks. Too much water can cause the potato-like rhizomes to rot, and the leaves to yellow. If you see yellow leaves take this as your sign to take it easy on the water.

Please take note that this plant is poisonous, give it a home on your mantel or tall dresser and don’t feed it to your kids for dinner.

Botanical name:
Zamioculcas zamiifolia

House Plants to Love : ZZ Plant

Light:
Keep this one away from direct southern light. This plant will be happier in indirect light or a moderately shady section of your home.

Watering:
If you do anything, underwater this plant. Make sure to let it dry out between waterings, and water it lightly.

House Plants to Love : ZZ Plant

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in Indoor Plants

Easy Target Hack

Easy Target Hack : Bentwood Sconce
Hey Guys! Here is a quick post that I wanted to share regarding this bentwood lamp from Target. The table lamps are on clearance right now for $30 bucks, and they are super easy to transform into sconces – in case you be needing a bentwood sconce. I just grabbed my jigsaw and chopped the bottom right off!

After chopping the base off the lamps, I used a countersink drill bit to make a flush hole in the shank, and then screwed them directly to the wall. The sconces flank my vestibule and I put both of them on a timer, in the evenings the house looks really inviting from the street. Anyway, it’s easy, and pretty inexpensive, and I thought you might like to know about it :)

Easy Target Hack : Bentwood Sconce

Easy Target Hack : Bentwood Sconce

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in Around the House, How-To, Porch

DIY Plywood Hanging Planter


Hey Guys! I found myself getting uncharacteristically crafty this week when I was coming up with low cost ways to add some hanging planters to the front porch. Last summer I made a few macrame hanging baskets for the space (which I still love) but I wanted something for the other end of the porch because of my plant hoarding problem and all. Also, I think I’m finally recovering from the crazy amount of work I had to do in the basement and am feeling very, very ready to take on small easy projects that require using tools, but don’t demand endless days to work on them. I was inspired by a mashup of this hanging planter from West Elm and this other one I found in the internet, and I decided to come up with my own version.

I’ve added some bentwood lamps to the porch recently (which I Target hacked and I’ll be sharing real soon), and I thought these simple, scandinavian inspired geometric planters would fit right in with the overall vibe. Not to toot my own horn or anything, but I think these planters look pretty awesome. They can easily be hung at different heights and the angles will stay parallel, which the obsessive crazy in me really appreciates.


Assuming you have the basic supplies, you should be crank out three of these planters in less than three hours and for less than $38 bucks. Figuring out the basic pattern was probably the hardest part, but do you know what, I did that for you. You’re welcome. All the dimensions and angles are listed above.

Dudes, use the carpenter square to make precise angles and lines for the planter, and make sure to use the compass when tracing your circular base.

CLICK FOR INSTRUCTIONS

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in Around the House, DIY, How-To

House Plants : Spider Plant


Hey Guys! So excited that it’s almost the weekend, my girlfriends (aka the She’Vaughns) and I have a whole 48 hours away from life, where we plan on mad chilling and drankin’ large amounts of champagne. It will be amazing.

I’ve got another indoor house plant for you today, the spider plant (aka the airplane plant). This one is a good one for all you “brown thumbs” out there as it’s very forgiving, and is a good introduction to rearing plant babies (aka propagation). If my memory serves me correctly, the spider plant and the heart shaped philodendron popped my plant cherry, and I’ve been hooked ever since. The spider plant is highly adaptable to lots of different conditions (aka it’s hard to kill) which is what makes it a perfect beginner plant.

They are called spider plants because they look like huge green variegated spiders, and they even make spider-like baby plants called spiderettes that hang down from long thread-like stems. The spiderettes can be easily propegated to make new spider plants, and will make you feel like a horticultural wizard. Just like a lot of plants do, you will notice that the spider plant flowers, and produces a lot of these spiderettes in the spring. Once the spiderette is a decent size, place it in well drained soil while keeping it attached to the mother plant. After a few weeks, the spiderette begins to take root, then you can trim it from the mother and blamo, you have a new plant!

Botanical name:
Chlorophytum comosum

Like I said, these plants can put up with a lot of different conditions, but they prefer bright indirect light. Plant them in well drained soil and water them heftily but do not allow the soil to become soggy or their roots may begin to rot. They can even handle drying out between waterings just in case you forget.

Browning leaves is common in spider plants. If your plant begins to brown it usually is because of the fluoride found in tap water which can cause build up in the soil. Trim off the brown and try watering with distilled water or rain water for a few waterings to flush out salts.

Light:
Prefer bright indirect sunlight

Watering:
Water the plant regularly making sure that the plant is well watered but not soggy. The plant can tolerate drying out between waterings.


These plants look great in hanging baskets and guess what? I’ve got a cool DIY hanging planter to share with you guys next week, I bet a spider plant would like pretty tyte in it…

Pink planter shown above can be found over here!

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in Indoor Plants