Deuce Cities Henhouse

Adding Color to the Boys’ Room

Color Blocking in the Boys room using Clark+Kensington Paint
Five years ago this month we moved into this house. The entire place was painted in a terrifyingly boring light brownish-yellowish color that was well past its prime, if there ever was any sort of prime for that brand of mediocrity. Bottom line: everything needed a fresh coat of paint. The first thing we did when we moved – like literally, before we unpacked a single bag – was tackle the bedroom of our then-20-month-old son, Finn. We painted his room a bright yellowy-green. There was no plan for this color, no design, no motive, no NOTHING, beyond our satisfaction that it was 100% not the bland death that existed before. The little baby that moved into that room 5 years ago is now nearly 7 and has a younger brother he now shares his bedroom with. Things have changed.

After we slapped that green paint up on the walls we didn’t gave it another thought for quite some time. Even 2 falls ago when the boys combined rooms and started sharing a bedroom, updating the paint color was the last thing on my to-do list. Fast forward to now, spring 2015 and I’m ready for a project. Lucky for me, my pals over at Ace gave me the inspiration to finally tackle those green walls and make this bedroom a space that is fun and happy for my boys.

You guys might not know it, but something really great happens in March. I know what you’re thinking, but no, it’s not the first day of spring, the snow melting, the sunshine, the college guys throwing the round orange sports ball at the netted circle… none of that. It’s actually the month of 31 Days of Color over at ThePaintStudio.com. For seriousness though, if you’re looking for color inspiration, that place is oozing it. All of us Ace bloggers are contributing by doing something special with a different Clark+Kensington color every day – so hop on over and see what some of my blogger pals are up to.

Color Blocking in the Boys room using Clark+Kensington Paint
I actually choose this bright, bright yellow OPI Color by Clark+Kensington color called ‘Need Sunglasses?’ It’s a super intense yellow, yes, but I wanted something that was bright, happy, fun and most importantly was a color the boys both actually liked. This bright yellow had to be an accent color in this space because it would’ve been too much to add that loud of a color to all four walls. It’s bright and intense, but it’s not scary – it’s perfect for pairing with cool-toned colors to create a fun and youthful vibe. We decided adding a geometric pattern to the walls and ceiling would be pretty cool, some sort of cool genius even planned it so that it would flank the bunk beds just perfectly.

Color Blocking in the Boys room using Clark+Kensington Paint
By the way guys, I painted these walls white first. I know everyone on the internetz is in search of the perfect white, and guess what you don’t have to look anymore, I think I’ve found it – I really like this one. I actually picked it really willy-nilly-like, and I lucked out. This is ‘Linen’ by Clark+Kensington and it is tyte. It errs on the warmer side and is just off-white enough to really set off crisp white trim and baseboards. It’ll be my go-to the next time I have the urge to paint something white.

After starting with a clean white slate I was able to throw up this colorful pattern on a Sunday afternoon and even had time to take a sandwich and beer break. Before I began mapping out the pattern and masking and painting, I took extra care to make sure that everything was level, square and plumb before I began. The first step was to outline the entire length of the pattern by dropping a chalk line. From there on, it was pretty straightforward and easy. I marked down the chalk line every 24″ and then started connecting the marks with a pencil and a ruler. See below for the measurements. Next I taped off sections using painters tape. This project required me painting in four different sections, and took 2-3 coats for every section (3 for the dark blue). All-in-all I was done in about 7 hours including snack break.

Geometrical Color Blocking Pattern

Color Blocking in the Boys room using Clark+Kensington Paint

Color Blocking in the Boys room using Clark+Kensington Paint
Not gonna lie, this color is bright but I really like it. I took the color palette of the entire house into consideration before moving ahead with this project. I wanted it to fit in with the vibe of the rest of the house while still feeling like a really cool boys’ bedroom. As recently as a few years ago yellow was a color found throughout accents in our entire house; it was a common thread and pulled everything together. Today you can find all those yellow accessories segregated in “the yellow room” – our spare bedroom. It just happens to contain a lot of items that aren’t as special to me as some of the newer decor we’ve brought into the house. It all really works in the yellow room though. Point is, there is yellow in our house. There is also blue, lots of blue and shades of turquoise. See, it all makes sense! I swear.

So guess what? Not only did Ace help me out with this project, but there’s a chance you could have them help you with a project too! Here’s the deal. If you’re interested in a color (today’s color or any of the other remaining days’ colors) Ace will be giving away free samples of the Color of the Day to the first 1,000 online entrants at ThePaintStudio.com. Here’s the big one though – enter the 31 Days of Color Sweepstakes daily for a chance to win a $10,000 paint makeover as well as daily $50 gift cards. I can’t even begin to imagine what a $10,000 paint makeover even looks like. If you win, you have to tell me.

Clark+Kensington 31 Days of Color

Color Blocking in the Boys room using Clark+Kensington Paint
Ace Hardware : 31 Days of Color

I’m excited to be collaborating with Ace Hardware as a part of their Ace Blogger Panel! Ace has provided me with compensation and the materials necessary to complete this project! All opinions are my own. Thanks a biznillion, Ace!
Pin on PinterestTweet about this on TwitterShare on Facebook

Related posts:

13 comments
in Around the House, DIY, Sponsored

Thinking About : The Garden

Astilbe
I’ve never grown Astible in the garden. Its flowers are so feathery and the foliage is reminiscent of ferns. It comes in array of colors and sizes and prefers the shade. I think it could look really stunning mixed in with the hostas on the shady side of the backyard garden.

This spring will mark the beginning of my sixth gardening season. All of the plants in the garden are mature now, and the garden and flower beds have really filled in. I can’t even tell you how much I love to watch the perennials grow and change every year – fer real, I’m kinda obsessed.

I was just starting to see peonies, sedum, and bleeding hearts push their way through the surface of the soil when as expected, March decided to totally diss the midwest. On sunday night it snowed and got really cold, it’s supposed to snow again tonight. Sometimes it’s really hard to live in such a wintery climate.

Trying to keep it poz-e (aka positive) though, so I’ve been doing a little garden dreaming and planning. I’ve spent a lot of time pouring over old garden posts highly anticipating what has to be right around the corner. The garden is mature now, most of the plants are very large and have filled in nicely. Some of them may even have to be split up this year or rearranged based on their size. This is where I can begin to play with layouts, heights, colors and start to fine tune, edit, and arrange the plants where they are happiest and look the prettiest. I’ve got my eye on a few perennials and bulbs that I am really hoping to add to the garden this summer. So here’ what I’m thinking:

Allium
Allium is a bulb and comes from the onion family most similarly related to chives or garlic. There are many many varieties of Allium varying in height, flower size, and color. I love the big purple poms sitting atop the straight narrow stems. These guys love partial sun and well drained soil, and I’m thinking these might have a chance out on the boulevard garden. The only downside is that they bloom in the spring and early summer – I need more late summer blooms on the boulevard – suggestion welcome.

Golden Japanese Forest Grass
Every time I see this ornamental grass I like it more and more. I really began noticing it last summer when I would take walks through a Japanese garden near our house. It loves shade and I think it could add a lot of texture and color mixed in with the hostas bed in the backyard, or as a mound on the boulevard too.
Pin on PinterestTweet about this on TwitterShare on Facebook

Related posts:

6 comments
in gardening, Inspiration

Veggie Garden Planning!

Involving Kids in Vegetable Garden Planning
Involving Kids in Vegetable Garden Planning

 
Pssst, hover your cursor over the garden drawing
Yo Guys! It’s Veggie Garden Planning season! Planning the coming year’s veggie garden with the kids has become my ultimate favorite sign of spring. Finn and I started this tradition four gardening seasons ago back in 2012. Gus was merely a little-dude-baby back then and Finn and I did this as a way to have Mom & Finn time. Although Finn is not the worlds biggest vegetable fan, he has always been very enthusiastic when it comes to tending and cultivating a garden. This year Gus is old enough to participate too. It does my heart good to see these two boys get so excited about growing things! Gus would like it if we could also plant some chocolate ice cream, french fries and chicken nugget seeds too – he’s kinda got the right idea.

Involving Kids in Vegetable Garden Planning
We’re all excited to get out in the dirt and get the garden ready for seeds and our little seedlings that we’ve been tending to over the last month or so. I’m going to be testing the pH of my soil this year for the first time and I’m curious to see how this will improve our gardens yield. I’m also trying pole beans for the first time! In the past we have grown bush beans, but I was always bummin’ by how quickly the harvest came and went. The pole beans should allow us a constant growth of new beans. We’re considering growing zucchini and/or summer squash on a trellis this year. Any of you have experience doing this? We don’t have a huge garden, so I was thinking one plant of each squash, and the internet tells me it’s easy to train the vines to grow on a trellis. Like I said, I’d love to hear from you if you’ve had experience with this. We’re trying potatoes again! Last year I just used some spuds from a bag of potatoes that had started growing roots – the results were lame. This year I’ve invested my $15 and am getting some real potato tubers from the professional seed people. I’ve got my fingers crossed that this will work, because there’s a little guy I know who’d really like to see me grow some french fries.

+++ OUR 2015 GARDEN +++
Cucumbers | Zucchini | Summer Squash | Carrots | Kale | Radishes | Broccoli | Rosemary | Basil | Pole Beans | Peas | Arugula | Bibb Lettuce | Cutting Lettuces | Potatoes
2014

Involving Kids in Vegetable Garden Planning

2013

Involving Kids in Vegetable Garden Planning

2012

Involving Kids in Vegetable Garden Planning

Pin on PinterestTweet about this on TwitterShare on Facebook
8 comments
in gardening

How to Edit Interior Photography Using Photoshop
Alright pals – as promised here it is, Part 2 of my photography posts. If you missed it, you can find Part 1 right here where I cover tips for setting up and styling the shot.

Okay, onward! Today I’ll be sharing my photoshop techniques. This is where the photo really comes to life. Before we dive into that, let’s talk about a few quick things.

I thought I should probably share a little about my gear. I use a Canon 7D camera, and I have an assortment of three go-to lenses. The first two are prime lenses (they have a fixed lens and don’t have a zoom), but prime lenses are really affordable. For vignettes I use my Canon EF 50mm f/1.8 Lens, and for wide shots I’ve been loving my brand new Canon EF-S 24mm f/2.8 pancake lens. The big dawg, good-for-everything lens is my Canon 17-40mm f/4L wide angle. I’m always curious about what other people are using, so hopefully that helps.

Let’s talk about photoshop. Yes, it’s scary if you haven’t used it, but there are a ton of great tutorials out there AND there are so many different techniques for using it and applying effects. I love to see how photoshop-fluent-friends use photoshop – everyone does it differently and its easy to learn new tricks from watching others use it. You can learn a lot from youtube vids and books too. If you don’t have PS installed on your ‘putron, but you’re interested in purchasing photoshop you can subscribe via Adobe starting at $9.99 per month or try the free 1-month trial.

What I am sharing with you today are the most common go-to photoshop tools that I use for standard interior image editing. There are always, always exceptions to the rule, and in photoshop there many different ways to achieve similar outcomes. For those of you unfamiliar to photoshop I hope that this guide will be an introduction to useful tools. With exploration of the ‘adjustment layers’, ‘layer masking’, and ‘image transformation’ you will begin to learn more and more about photoshop and the endless possibilities it can provide.

RAW Image

How to Edit Interior Photography Using Photoshop
One of the easiest things you can do to produce a better image, is make sure you are shooting RAW. The RAW file format captures all the image data, where as in a jpeg image, information is compressed and the quality is lessened. Shooting RAW allows your camera’s light sensor to capture a higher range of color and brightness, which in turn translates to more attainable quality in post-production editing. The downside is that the RAW format takes up more storage space on your camera or computer, and it can slow your camera down – but really when you’re just shooting interiors, the good outweigh the bad.

SEE MORE, READ MORE

Pin on PinterestTweet about this on TwitterShare on Facebook

Related posts:

12 comments
in Photography, Tutorial

A Bit of Spring

Add Spring to your home using grocery store bulb gardens and pretty little vessels
One of my new favorite things is growing mini bulb gardens indoors. Last fall and winter I grew paper white bulbs inside of these small, matte, pale coral “bowls” I picked up at CB2 last spring. I really enjoyed having these mini gardens for a good chunk of the winter as semi-permanent floral arrangements on our bed side tables. I was hungry to find bulbs to grow in these small pots this spring. I couldn’t resist when I saw a spring bulb arrangement wrapped in purple foil at the grocery store last week. For $12 bucks I snapped it up and brought it home. I quickly disassembled the garden and reassembled it in my tiny pots, placing them on our night stands. If all goes well, we’ll be enjoying yellow daffodils, purple hyacinth, blue muscari and colorful tulips for the next few weeks. You should probably try it too.
Add Spring to your home using grocery store bulb gardens and pretty little vessels
Add Spring to your home using grocery store bulb gardens and pretty little vessels

Add Spring to your home using grocery store bulb gardens and pretty little vessels
What bulbs grow in the summer/early fall seasons? Does that even exist?

Pin on PinterestTweet about this on TwitterShare on Facebook

Related posts:

4 comments
in Around the House, Decor